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"Many times in life I’ve regretted the things I’ve said without thinking. But I’ve never regretted the things I said nearly as much as the words I left unspoken."
Lisa Kleypas, Sugar Daddy (via larmoyante)
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itsanavi:

verdantdeer:

socksinabocks:

what even

GOOGLIE EYES

This is important because reasons

BRI
itsanavi:

verdantdeer:

socksinabocks:

what even

GOOGLIE EYES

This is important because reasons

BRI
itsanavi:

verdantdeer:

socksinabocks:

what even

GOOGLIE EYES

This is important because reasons

BRI
itsanavi:

verdantdeer:

socksinabocks:

what even

GOOGLIE EYES

This is important because reasons

BRI
itsanavi:

verdantdeer:

socksinabocks:

what even

GOOGLIE EYES

This is important because reasons

BRI
itsanavi:

verdantdeer:

socksinabocks:

what even

GOOGLIE EYES

This is important because reasons

BRI
itsanavi:

verdantdeer:

socksinabocks:

what even

GOOGLIE EYES

This is important because reasons

BRI
itsanavi:

verdantdeer:

socksinabocks:

what even

GOOGLIE EYES

This is important because reasons

BRI
itsanavi:

verdantdeer:

socksinabocks:

what even

GOOGLIE EYES

This is important because reasons

BRI
itsanavi:

verdantdeer:

socksinabocks:

what even

GOOGLIE EYES

This is important because reasons

BRI
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$100
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Album Art
163,502 plays Source
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castielismycherrypie:

dubsexplicit:

wet—kitty:

no one will ever understand the deep fucking connection I have with this film

For real though

Ok guys I need to talk about this movie.
The Breakfast Club came out in 1985 and to this day is, in my opinion, one of the greatest damn movies ever to barely even have a script.
During the famous “dance” scene, Molly Ringwald, who played the “princess” Claire, was supposed to a small little dance by herself, but she was shy so all of them did some dancing together, creating one of the most famous film scene’s to date. It was improvised.
During the scene in the film where the characters sat down and told why they were there, there was NO SCRIPT. John Hughes told the cast to sit there and improvise why they thought their characters were there, creating that heart wrenching scene everyone could relate to.
EVERYONE can relate to this movie and thats the best damn thing. 
On March 24, 1984, five students entered a detention room thinking it was just another Saturday. Before the day was over, they broke the rules, bared their souls, and touched each other in a way they never dreamed possible.
EVERYONE IN THE WORLD NEEDS TO SEE THE BREAKFAST CLUB.
castielismycherrypie:

dubsexplicit:

wet—kitty:

no one will ever understand the deep fucking connection I have with this film

For real though

Ok guys I need to talk about this movie.
The Breakfast Club came out in 1985 and to this day is, in my opinion, one of the greatest damn movies ever to barely even have a script.
During the famous “dance” scene, Molly Ringwald, who played the “princess” Claire, was supposed to a small little dance by herself, but she was shy so all of them did some dancing together, creating one of the most famous film scene’s to date. It was improvised.
During the scene in the film where the characters sat down and told why they were there, there was NO SCRIPT. John Hughes told the cast to sit there and improvise why they thought their characters were there, creating that heart wrenching scene everyone could relate to.
EVERYONE can relate to this movie and thats the best damn thing. 
On March 24, 1984, five students entered a detention room thinking it was just another Saturday. Before the day was over, they broke the rules, bared their souls, and touched each other in a way they never dreamed possible.
EVERYONE IN THE WORLD NEEDS TO SEE THE BREAKFAST CLUB.
castielismycherrypie:

dubsexplicit:

wet—kitty:

no one will ever understand the deep fucking connection I have with this film

For real though

Ok guys I need to talk about this movie.
The Breakfast Club came out in 1985 and to this day is, in my opinion, one of the greatest damn movies ever to barely even have a script.
During the famous “dance” scene, Molly Ringwald, who played the “princess” Claire, was supposed to a small little dance by herself, but she was shy so all of them did some dancing together, creating one of the most famous film scene’s to date. It was improvised.
During the scene in the film where the characters sat down and told why they were there, there was NO SCRIPT. John Hughes told the cast to sit there and improvise why they thought their characters were there, creating that heart wrenching scene everyone could relate to.
EVERYONE can relate to this movie and thats the best damn thing. 
On March 24, 1984, five students entered a detention room thinking it was just another Saturday. Before the day was over, they broke the rules, bared their souls, and touched each other in a way they never dreamed possible.
EVERYONE IN THE WORLD NEEDS TO SEE THE BREAKFAST CLUB.
castielismycherrypie:

dubsexplicit:

wet—kitty:

no one will ever understand the deep fucking connection I have with this film

For real though

Ok guys I need to talk about this movie.
The Breakfast Club came out in 1985 and to this day is, in my opinion, one of the greatest damn movies ever to barely even have a script.
During the famous “dance” scene, Molly Ringwald, who played the “princess” Claire, was supposed to a small little dance by herself, but she was shy so all of them did some dancing together, creating one of the most famous film scene’s to date. It was improvised.
During the scene in the film where the characters sat down and told why they were there, there was NO SCRIPT. John Hughes told the cast to sit there and improvise why they thought their characters were there, creating that heart wrenching scene everyone could relate to.
EVERYONE can relate to this movie and thats the best damn thing. 
On March 24, 1984, five students entered a detention room thinking it was just another Saturday. Before the day was over, they broke the rules, bared their souls, and touched each other in a way they never dreamed possible.
EVERYONE IN THE WORLD NEEDS TO SEE THE BREAKFAST CLUB.
castielismycherrypie:

dubsexplicit:

wet—kitty:

no one will ever understand the deep fucking connection I have with this film

For real though

Ok guys I need to talk about this movie.
The Breakfast Club came out in 1985 and to this day is, in my opinion, one of the greatest damn movies ever to barely even have a script.
During the famous “dance” scene, Molly Ringwald, who played the “princess” Claire, was supposed to a small little dance by herself, but she was shy so all of them did some dancing together, creating one of the most famous film scene’s to date. It was improvised.
During the scene in the film where the characters sat down and told why they were there, there was NO SCRIPT. John Hughes told the cast to sit there and improvise why they thought their characters were there, creating that heart wrenching scene everyone could relate to.
EVERYONE can relate to this movie and thats the best damn thing. 
On March 24, 1984, five students entered a detention room thinking it was just another Saturday. Before the day was over, they broke the rules, bared their souls, and touched each other in a way they never dreamed possible.
EVERYONE IN THE WORLD NEEDS TO SEE THE BREAKFAST CLUB.
castielismycherrypie:

dubsexplicit:

wet—kitty:

no one will ever understand the deep fucking connection I have with this film

For real though

Ok guys I need to talk about this movie.
The Breakfast Club came out in 1985 and to this day is, in my opinion, one of the greatest damn movies ever to barely even have a script.
During the famous “dance” scene, Molly Ringwald, who played the “princess” Claire, was supposed to a small little dance by herself, but she was shy so all of them did some dancing together, creating one of the most famous film scene’s to date. It was improvised.
During the scene in the film where the characters sat down and told why they were there, there was NO SCRIPT. John Hughes told the cast to sit there and improvise why they thought their characters were there, creating that heart wrenching scene everyone could relate to.
EVERYONE can relate to this movie and thats the best damn thing. 
On March 24, 1984, five students entered a detention room thinking it was just another Saturday. Before the day was over, they broke the rules, bared their souls, and touched each other in a way they never dreamed possible.
EVERYONE IN THE WORLD NEEDS TO SEE THE BREAKFAST CLUB.
castielismycherrypie:

dubsexplicit:

wet—kitty:

no one will ever understand the deep fucking connection I have with this film

For real though

Ok guys I need to talk about this movie.
The Breakfast Club came out in 1985 and to this day is, in my opinion, one of the greatest damn movies ever to barely even have a script.
During the famous “dance” scene, Molly Ringwald, who played the “princess” Claire, was supposed to a small little dance by herself, but she was shy so all of them did some dancing together, creating one of the most famous film scene’s to date. It was improvised.
During the scene in the film where the characters sat down and told why they were there, there was NO SCRIPT. John Hughes told the cast to sit there and improvise why they thought their characters were there, creating that heart wrenching scene everyone could relate to.
EVERYONE can relate to this movie and thats the best damn thing. 
On March 24, 1984, five students entered a detention room thinking it was just another Saturday. Before the day was over, they broke the rules, bared their souls, and touched each other in a way they never dreamed possible.
EVERYONE IN THE WORLD NEEDS TO SEE THE BREAKFAST CLUB.
castielismycherrypie:

dubsexplicit:

wet—kitty:

no one will ever understand the deep fucking connection I have with this film

For real though

Ok guys I need to talk about this movie.
The Breakfast Club came out in 1985 and to this day is, in my opinion, one of the greatest damn movies ever to barely even have a script.
During the famous “dance” scene, Molly Ringwald, who played the “princess” Claire, was supposed to a small little dance by herself, but she was shy so all of them did some dancing together, creating one of the most famous film scene’s to date. It was improvised.
During the scene in the film where the characters sat down and told why they were there, there was NO SCRIPT. John Hughes told the cast to sit there and improvise why they thought their characters were there, creating that heart wrenching scene everyone could relate to.
EVERYONE can relate to this movie and thats the best damn thing. 
On March 24, 1984, five students entered a detention room thinking it was just another Saturday. Before the day was over, they broke the rules, bared their souls, and touched each other in a way they never dreamed possible.
EVERYONE IN THE WORLD NEEDS TO SEE THE BREAKFAST CLUB.
castielismycherrypie:

dubsexplicit:

wet—kitty:

no one will ever understand the deep fucking connection I have with this film

For real though

Ok guys I need to talk about this movie.
The Breakfast Club came out in 1985 and to this day is, in my opinion, one of the greatest damn movies ever to barely even have a script.
During the famous “dance” scene, Molly Ringwald, who played the “princess” Claire, was supposed to a small little dance by herself, but she was shy so all of them did some dancing together, creating one of the most famous film scene’s to date. It was improvised.
During the scene in the film where the characters sat down and told why they were there, there was NO SCRIPT. John Hughes told the cast to sit there and improvise why they thought their characters were there, creating that heart wrenching scene everyone could relate to.
EVERYONE can relate to this movie and thats the best damn thing. 
On March 24, 1984, five students entered a detention room thinking it was just another Saturday. Before the day was over, they broke the rules, bared their souls, and touched each other in a way they never dreamed possible.
EVERYONE IN THE WORLD NEEDS TO SEE THE BREAKFAST CLUB.
castielismycherrypie:

dubsexplicit:

wet—kitty:

no one will ever understand the deep fucking connection I have with this film

For real though

Ok guys I need to talk about this movie.
The Breakfast Club came out in 1985 and to this day is, in my opinion, one of the greatest damn movies ever to barely even have a script.
During the famous “dance” scene, Molly Ringwald, who played the “princess” Claire, was supposed to a small little dance by herself, but she was shy so all of them did some dancing together, creating one of the most famous film scene’s to date. It was improvised.
During the scene in the film where the characters sat down and told why they were there, there was NO SCRIPT. John Hughes told the cast to sit there and improvise why they thought their characters were there, creating that heart wrenching scene everyone could relate to.
EVERYONE can relate to this movie and thats the best damn thing. 
On March 24, 1984, five students entered a detention room thinking it was just another Saturday. Before the day was over, they broke the rules, bared their souls, and touched each other in a way they never dreamed possible.
EVERYONE IN THE WORLD NEEDS TO SEE THE BREAKFAST CLUB.
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winstonpaul:

Honesty Hour, Ask me anything! Nothing will go unanswered
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pervertsofcolor:

savvyifyanasty:

luvemthicke:

OH. MY. DAMN!! 😁🔥👌👏😝😍

> perfect! 

THANK YOU DADDY
pervertsofcolor:

savvyifyanasty:

luvemthicke:

OH. MY. DAMN!! 😁🔥👌👏😝😍

> perfect! 

THANK YOU DADDY
pervertsofcolor:

savvyifyanasty:

luvemthicke:

OH. MY. DAMN!! 😁🔥👌👏😝😍

> perfect! 

THANK YOU DADDY
pervertsofcolor:

savvyifyanasty:

luvemthicke:

OH. MY. DAMN!! 😁🔥👌👏😝😍

> perfect! 

THANK YOU DADDY
pervertsofcolor:

savvyifyanasty:

luvemthicke:

OH. MY. DAMN!! 😁🔥👌👏😝😍

> perfect! 

THANK YOU DADDY
pervertsofcolor:

savvyifyanasty:

luvemthicke:

OH. MY. DAMN!! 😁🔥👌👏😝😍

> perfect! 

THANK YOU DADDY
pervertsofcolor:

savvyifyanasty:

luvemthicke:

OH. MY. DAMN!! 😁🔥👌👏😝😍

> perfect! 

THANK YOU DADDY
pervertsofcolor:

savvyifyanasty:

luvemthicke:

OH. MY. DAMN!! 😁🔥👌👏😝😍

> perfect! 

THANK YOU DADDY
pervertsofcolor:

savvyifyanasty:

luvemthicke:

OH. MY. DAMN!! 😁🔥👌👏😝😍

> perfect! 

THANK YOU DADDY
pervertsofcolor:

savvyifyanasty:

luvemthicke:

OH. MY. DAMN!! 😁🔥👌👏😝😍

> perfect! 

THANK YOU DADDY
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thechanelmuse:

"My mom owned a hair salon for 25 years, and I have seen every texture, every color, every length, and I was always taught from a young age that good hair is healthy hair. 
[As black women], we are so hard on ourselves. After people saw my hair for the first time [shaved after wearing it below the shoulder], I got all the backlash. There were a lot of jokes; people who just flat out say, “You’re ugly without your hair.” On Twitter, it was the No. 3 trending topic. I was like, These are my people and this is what is important to them? I have family that still has those attitudes [of light skin and long hair being automatically better than dark skin and short hair].
I think that when I was younger, I may have tried extra hard to be like, Let me get dirty. I think my mother, whether she would admit it or not, overcompensated in ways to do the same, because she felt like people would think she was too bougie. She even told me when she was younger she went through this Angela Davis phase where she would put sand in her hair. Clorox in her hair to make it coarser because she always felt like people were judging her to be that typical lighter-complexioned, fine hair, green-eyed woman. 
We had so  much resentment growing up. My mom, who is [Louisiana] Creole, was so protective against family influences. She was scared for us, because many of my cousins still are doing brown paper bag tests [meaning if you’re lighter than a paper bag you’re okay and if you’re darker are not], maybe not literally…
After I had my son, and I was married, I wanted to be the typical pretty, long-haired trophy wife. That’s when I started wearing weaves—long and blonde. I would cook three meals a day, be with my baby, clean the house, and bring cookie’s to my ex-husband’s football team. But as soon as we broke up, I was like, This shit is gone! [Laughter] This doesn’t even look right with my skin tone. Since then I’ve done whatever the hell I wanted.
Can we talk about how many people have given me these kind hugs when I had a weave?…
When I cut my hair off, I felt liberated. I felt like the time, energy, and money that I was putting into maintaining everyday could go to maintaining myself, my emotional and my mental growth.”
— Solange, excerpts from her interview in “The Root of The Issue" (Essence magazine, 2009)
thechanelmuse:

"My mom owned a hair salon for 25 years, and I have seen every texture, every color, every length, and I was always taught from a young age that good hair is healthy hair. 
[As black women], we are so hard on ourselves. After people saw my hair for the first time [shaved after wearing it below the shoulder], I got all the backlash. There were a lot of jokes; people who just flat out say, “You’re ugly without your hair.” On Twitter, it was the No. 3 trending topic. I was like, These are my people and this is what is important to them? I have family that still has those attitudes [of light skin and long hair being automatically better than dark skin and short hair].
I think that when I was younger, I may have tried extra hard to be like, Let me get dirty. I think my mother, whether she would admit it or not, overcompensated in ways to do the same, because she felt like people would think she was too bougie. She even told me when she was younger she went through this Angela Davis phase where she would put sand in her hair. Clorox in her hair to make it coarser because she always felt like people were judging her to be that typical lighter-complexioned, fine hair, green-eyed woman. 
We had so  much resentment growing up. My mom, who is [Louisiana] Creole, was so protective against family influences. She was scared for us, because many of my cousins still are doing brown paper bag tests [meaning if you’re lighter than a paper bag you’re okay and if you’re darker are not], maybe not literally…
After I had my son, and I was married, I wanted to be the typical pretty, long-haired trophy wife. That’s when I started wearing weaves—long and blonde. I would cook three meals a day, be with my baby, clean the house, and bring cookie’s to my ex-husband’s football team. But as soon as we broke up, I was like, This shit is gone! [Laughter] This doesn’t even look right with my skin tone. Since then I’ve done whatever the hell I wanted.
Can we talk about how many people have given me these kind hugs when I had a weave?…
When I cut my hair off, I felt liberated. I felt like the time, energy, and money that I was putting into maintaining everyday could go to maintaining myself, my emotional and my mental growth.”
— Solange, excerpts from her interview in “The Root of The Issue" (Essence magazine, 2009)
thechanelmuse:

"My mom owned a hair salon for 25 years, and I have seen every texture, every color, every length, and I was always taught from a young age that good hair is healthy hair. 
[As black women], we are so hard on ourselves. After people saw my hair for the first time [shaved after wearing it below the shoulder], I got all the backlash. There were a lot of jokes; people who just flat out say, “You’re ugly without your hair.” On Twitter, it was the No. 3 trending topic. I was like, These are my people and this is what is important to them? I have family that still has those attitudes [of light skin and long hair being automatically better than dark skin and short hair].
I think that when I was younger, I may have tried extra hard to be like, Let me get dirty. I think my mother, whether she would admit it or not, overcompensated in ways to do the same, because she felt like people would think she was too bougie. She even told me when she was younger she went through this Angela Davis phase where she would put sand in her hair. Clorox in her hair to make it coarser because she always felt like people were judging her to be that typical lighter-complexioned, fine hair, green-eyed woman. 
We had so  much resentment growing up. My mom, who is [Louisiana] Creole, was so protective against family influences. She was scared for us, because many of my cousins still are doing brown paper bag tests [meaning if you’re lighter than a paper bag you’re okay and if you’re darker are not], maybe not literally…
After I had my son, and I was married, I wanted to be the typical pretty, long-haired trophy wife. That’s when I started wearing weaves—long and blonde. I would cook three meals a day, be with my baby, clean the house, and bring cookie’s to my ex-husband’s football team. But as soon as we broke up, I was like, This shit is gone! [Laughter] This doesn’t even look right with my skin tone. Since then I’ve done whatever the hell I wanted.
Can we talk about how many people have given me these kind hugs when I had a weave?…
When I cut my hair off, I felt liberated. I felt like the time, energy, and money that I was putting into maintaining everyday could go to maintaining myself, my emotional and my mental growth.”
— Solange, excerpts from her interview in “The Root of The Issue" (Essence magazine, 2009)
thechanelmuse:

"My mom owned a hair salon for 25 years, and I have seen every texture, every color, every length, and I was always taught from a young age that good hair is healthy hair. 
[As black women], we are so hard on ourselves. After people saw my hair for the first time [shaved after wearing it below the shoulder], I got all the backlash. There were a lot of jokes; people who just flat out say, “You’re ugly without your hair.” On Twitter, it was the No. 3 trending topic. I was like, These are my people and this is what is important to them? I have family that still has those attitudes [of light skin and long hair being automatically better than dark skin and short hair].
I think that when I was younger, I may have tried extra hard to be like, Let me get dirty. I think my mother, whether she would admit it or not, overcompensated in ways to do the same, because she felt like people would think she was too bougie. She even told me when she was younger she went through this Angela Davis phase where she would put sand in her hair. Clorox in her hair to make it coarser because she always felt like people were judging her to be that typical lighter-complexioned, fine hair, green-eyed woman. 
We had so  much resentment growing up. My mom, who is [Louisiana] Creole, was so protective against family influences. She was scared for us, because many of my cousins still are doing brown paper bag tests [meaning if you’re lighter than a paper bag you’re okay and if you’re darker are not], maybe not literally…
After I had my son, and I was married, I wanted to be the typical pretty, long-haired trophy wife. That’s when I started wearing weaves—long and blonde. I would cook three meals a day, be with my baby, clean the house, and bring cookie’s to my ex-husband’s football team. But as soon as we broke up, I was like, This shit is gone! [Laughter] This doesn’t even look right with my skin tone. Since then I’ve done whatever the hell I wanted.
Can we talk about how many people have given me these kind hugs when I had a weave?…
When I cut my hair off, I felt liberated. I felt like the time, energy, and money that I was putting into maintaining everyday could go to maintaining myself, my emotional and my mental growth.”
— Solange, excerpts from her interview in “The Root of The Issue" (Essence magazine, 2009)
thechanelmuse:

"My mom owned a hair salon for 25 years, and I have seen every texture, every color, every length, and I was always taught from a young age that good hair is healthy hair. 
[As black women], we are so hard on ourselves. After people saw my hair for the first time [shaved after wearing it below the shoulder], I got all the backlash. There were a lot of jokes; people who just flat out say, “You’re ugly without your hair.” On Twitter, it was the No. 3 trending topic. I was like, These are my people and this is what is important to them? I have family that still has those attitudes [of light skin and long hair being automatically better than dark skin and short hair].
I think that when I was younger, I may have tried extra hard to be like, Let me get dirty. I think my mother, whether she would admit it or not, overcompensated in ways to do the same, because she felt like people would think she was too bougie. She even told me when she was younger she went through this Angela Davis phase where she would put sand in her hair. Clorox in her hair to make it coarser because she always felt like people were judging her to be that typical lighter-complexioned, fine hair, green-eyed woman. 
We had so  much resentment growing up. My mom, who is [Louisiana] Creole, was so protective against family influences. She was scared for us, because many of my cousins still are doing brown paper bag tests [meaning if you’re lighter than a paper bag you’re okay and if you’re darker are not], maybe not literally…
After I had my son, and I was married, I wanted to be the typical pretty, long-haired trophy wife. That’s when I started wearing weaves—long and blonde. I would cook three meals a day, be with my baby, clean the house, and bring cookie’s to my ex-husband’s football team. But as soon as we broke up, I was like, This shit is gone! [Laughter] This doesn’t even look right with my skin tone. Since then I’ve done whatever the hell I wanted.
Can we talk about how many people have given me these kind hugs when I had a weave?…
When I cut my hair off, I felt liberated. I felt like the time, energy, and money that I was putting into maintaining everyday could go to maintaining myself, my emotional and my mental growth.”
— Solange, excerpts from her interview in “The Root of The Issue" (Essence magazine, 2009)
thechanelmuse:

"My mom owned a hair salon for 25 years, and I have seen every texture, every color, every length, and I was always taught from a young age that good hair is healthy hair. 
[As black women], we are so hard on ourselves. After people saw my hair for the first time [shaved after wearing it below the shoulder], I got all the backlash. There were a lot of jokes; people who just flat out say, “You’re ugly without your hair.” On Twitter, it was the No. 3 trending topic. I was like, These are my people and this is what is important to them? I have family that still has those attitudes [of light skin and long hair being automatically better than dark skin and short hair].
I think that when I was younger, I may have tried extra hard to be like, Let me get dirty. I think my mother, whether she would admit it or not, overcompensated in ways to do the same, because she felt like people would think she was too bougie. She even told me when she was younger she went through this Angela Davis phase where she would put sand in her hair. Clorox in her hair to make it coarser because she always felt like people were judging her to be that typical lighter-complexioned, fine hair, green-eyed woman. 
We had so  much resentment growing up. My mom, who is [Louisiana] Creole, was so protective against family influences. She was scared for us, because many of my cousins still are doing brown paper bag tests [meaning if you’re lighter than a paper bag you’re okay and if you’re darker are not], maybe not literally…
After I had my son, and I was married, I wanted to be the typical pretty, long-haired trophy wife. That’s when I started wearing weaves—long and blonde. I would cook three meals a day, be with my baby, clean the house, and bring cookie’s to my ex-husband’s football team. But as soon as we broke up, I was like, This shit is gone! [Laughter] This doesn’t even look right with my skin tone. Since then I’ve done whatever the hell I wanted.
Can we talk about how many people have given me these kind hugs when I had a weave?…
When I cut my hair off, I felt liberated. I felt like the time, energy, and money that I was putting into maintaining everyday could go to maintaining myself, my emotional and my mental growth.”
— Solange, excerpts from her interview in “The Root of The Issue" (Essence magazine, 2009)
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valvala:

im a man and i LOVE sitting on GIANT BALLSACKS

finally
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dynastylnoire:

gailsimone:

megavillainess:

Me & my daughter cosplaying together !

BEST EVER.

Everyone go home.
they just won everything in life
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condommonologues:

There is more than one way to fuck safely.  Which method is best for you?
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sky-art-and-design:

This is an art print for Anime Expo 2014. I wanted to do an encouraging piece and tried out a different coloring style. I really like how it turned out. Also just encase you didn’t know she has a skin pigment condition but she makes sure to encourage herself and let herself know that she is beautiful and awesome no matter the color of her skin. I hope this will also encourage others too!
I have 8 x 11 prints printed out for the convention. I’m not sure how well these will be received but I can also post them up on my online store if people are interested in buy a copy online, just let me know ^^